JavaScript seems to be disabled in your browser. For the best experience on our site, be sure to turn on Javascript in your browser. This magazine is designed to fit your Swiss K31 rifle the same as the military original, and will fit and feed 6 rounds of 7.

Ensure your prized K31 continues to function by purchasing a spare magazine, which is essential to the function of your K The Swiss Schmidt-Rubin K31 rifle has been prized by collectors since the very first rifles were imported. With a legendary history of accuracy, quick straight-pull action, and a uniquely Swiss design it is no wonder why these rifles have been so popular.

These rifles use a unique detachable 6-round magazine to feed ammunition, which if your original becomes non-functional your K31 will become a single shot rifle. We produced these magazines to give you a high quality replacement magazine for your K With these magazines inserted, your K31 will be able to fit and feed the standard 6-rounds of 7.

These magazines will ensure that now and into the future your K31 rifle will continue to function just as good as it did the day it was accepted by the Swiss military. Out of stock. Subscribe to back in stock notification. Add to Wish List Add to Compare. Schmidt-Rubin K31 Magazine.

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swiss 1889 magazine

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Returns and Refunds Policy: If you are unhappy with your purchase please contact sales cogunsales. Press enter to begin your search. Sign up to receive exclusive offers and new product updates! Email Address. Read more. Add to cart.Dark Bore. Cracked Charging Handle Knob. P Stamped. The Model rifle is the first in a series of Schmidt-Rubin rifles put into service by the Swiss Military from the s through the s.

The revolutionary straight pull bolt design allowed the user to unlock the action and eject a spent cartridge in one motion, then push forward to load the next round, arm the striker, and lock the action, saving time between shots.

The rifle is chambered in 7. The cookie settings on this website are set to 'allow all cookies' to give you the very best experience. Please click Accept Cookies to continue to use the site. Click to zoom in. Current Stock:. Related Products Customers Also Viewed. Non-matching stock and handguard serial numbers. Bolt matching serial number. Magazine matching serial Stock and handguard non-matching serial numbers.

Magazine matching serial number Stock and handguard matching serial numbers. Dark bore at the muzzle. Sharp rifling.

Stamped The Model rifle is the first in a series of Long beautiful tigers stripes throughout the entire stock. The Model rifle is the first in a Stock has various scratched markings on it. Missing Front Sight. Appears to have had finished polished off.

There is a crack on the charging knob and a small chip on the stock nearPhoto: Hanson Hovell Holladay. With the exception of the M1 Garand carried by United States troops in the Second World War, during both World Wars the standard issue rifles for the feuding nations were bolt actions.

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Designed to fire the intimidating 7. Measuring over four feet, the Swiss rifle surpasses the length of other standard issue rifles from the era, even the Mosin-Nagant.

It was very common for the serviceman issued the rifle to remove the plate and place inside a slip of paper, which had written upon it his name and a series of identifying numbers. It is indeed a nice, historical touch to a beautiful firearm, and, in truth, best kept safe right where it is if you ever come across an example.

swiss 1889 magazine

These elements were only surpassed in value by the series of Lee Enfield rifles used by the English and Australian forceswhich were equipped with a ten round box magazine with the release directly in front of the trigger. Though perhaps lost to the ages, further identifying numbers may help determine the provenance of particular examples of this rifle. It allows the shooter to better maintain their aim downrange between firings as it removes the step of lifting the bolt before pulling.

The Straight Pull bolt action may seem like a novelty, but does allow the shooter to maintain their target better while cycling rounds. It is quite thick, unlike the almost hair-thin front sight of the Lee Enfield, and, to an extent, the Mosin-Nagant of the Soviet Union.

ANTIQUE SWISS SCHMIDT RUBIN 1889 RIFLE, 7.5×53.5

For many shooters this enlarged sight allows them to acquire targets much faster without having to continuously shift their focus. Like most firearms of this era, finding and purchasing newly produced ammunition can get expensive, such as in the case of the.

At the moment, the only new 7. Finding 7. As many know well, this ammunition is both dirty and corrosive, so it is always important to at least clean the bore of the rifle after every shooting, even if only firing the six rounds of a single box magazine. This is indeed an excellent price for a stunning firearm that is worthy of any collector and, above all else, an absolute pleasure at the range. Big game hunters shopping for a well-built wheelgun with stopping power need look no further than this handful.

The CZ line of gas-less semi-automatic shotguns is not only new to the company but fairly new to the Over the last year some of the best reflex sights the market has seen made their way to consumers.I recently picked up several Swiss rifles from Simpson Ltd who has a who bunch of them, and all listed individually so you can choose the exact rifle you want. The Swiss used an evolving series of straight-pull rifles and carbines from into the s, when the last K31 carbines were finally retired from service.

The four I picked out were a pretty good overview of how the design evolved. The first is a Gewehr — the rifle that replaced the turnbolt Vetterli rifle. The has a round magazine and used a semi-smokeless cartridge, the GP90 GP 18 90, not to be confused with the 5. It uses a heavy round-nose 7. The magazine was permanently attached, with a lever allowing it to be dropped just below the line of the bolt, to act as a reserve while the rifle was fired as a single-shot.

The Swiss military realized the ballistic deficiency of the round-nose GP90, and developed a smokeless powder, higher pressure, spitzer-bullet cartridge in Many of the Model rifles had already been strengthened in by moving their locking lugs up closer to the chamber, and it was determined that a simple rebarreling would allow them to shoot the new cartridge.

In addition to the new barrel, the conversion replaced the magazine with a new 6-round detachable type, added a semi-pistol grip to the stock, and replaced the sights.

In addition to striking me as a very sleek and attractive looking rifle, it has several subtle features showing that its designers were very familiar with the needs of a serious precision shooter. To wit:. The third rifle I got was a Gewehr They are reputed to be the least-accurate of the Swiss rifles, simply because they have the shortest and lightest barrels.

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Still, after seeing the quality and attention to detail on the GewehrI will definitely be adding a K11 to my collection sooner or later. Lastly, I got a K31 carbine. With this design, the bolt was redesigned, in a fairly significant departure from the original Schmidt mechanism. The new design which was the brainchild of Major Furrer, who was behind several other Swiss arms designs was almost half the overall length of the pattern bolt. This allowed the same overall length of carbine to have a barrel several inches longer, and also be both stronger and less expensive to manufacture.

Quite a deal for the Swiss government! The K31 has a few improvements beyond the length and bolt strength, including a rear sight graduated down to m the pattern starts at mand a set of hefty protective ears around the front sight. However, I find the length of pull to be a bit too short for comfort, and the redesigned bolt is not as smooth to operate.

We will definitely be doing a video comparing all of these models both disassembled on the shop table and out at the range! We found it in the […]. The 20mm Oerlikon automatic cannon was a mainstay of United States naval air defense during World War 2, and today we will look at a few of the characteristics and questions that apply to this […]. Designed by Adolf Furrer, this carbine represents a very early experiment with intermediate power ammunition.

It is a long recoil semiautomatic carbine with an under barrel tube magazine — quite the interesting combination of 19th […]. I would like to point out, because it was never made clear to me until I handled one, that the cocking ring on these Swiss straight pulls make it so you CANNOT cycle the action while maintaining a cheek weld to the stock. I held a K31 to my shoulder, sighted, pulled the action open, and promptly busted myself in the eye with the rather narrow cocking ring as soon as the camming handle had unlocked the mechanism, which hurt like hell.

Nobody ever points that out. I just thought I would. Otherwise, the rifles are very well made, and excellent values. In my case, using a Modell Schmidt-Rubin 7.The Schmidt—Rubin rifles were a series of Swiss Army service rifles in use between and They are distinguished by the straight-pull bolt action invented by Rudolf Schmidt and use Eduard Rubin 's 7.

swiss 1889 magazine

The Model was the first in the series of Schmidt—Rubin rifles which served Switzerland from to The rifle takes its name from the designer of its action, Colonel Rudolf Schmidt, and the designer of its ammunition, Colonel Eduard Rubin.

Production of the rifle began in The straight-pull bolt action allows the user to pull the bolt straight back to unlock the action, cock the striker, extract and eject the spent cartridge in one motion, and then push the bolt forward to chamber a round and lock the action. This is as opposed to a traditional bolt action, wherein the user must lift the bolt handle to unlock the action before pulling the bolt back. The rifle is roughly musket length with a free-floating barrelround magazine and wood stock that extends almost to the tip of the barrel.

The Schmidt—Rubin was an advanced weapon for its time. The Schmidt—Rubin was one of the first rifles to use copper-jacketed ammunition as its standard ammunition.

The GP90 7. Rubin in was revolutionary in that most of the bullets used in Europe at the time, except for the Mle Lebel rifle metal-jacketed 8mm bullet, were around. Strangely enough, the round was "paper patched" meaning that the bullet was surrounded by a piece of paper, much like the cotton patches placed around a musket ball. Paper patching the round was supposed to aid in the lubrication of the bullet.

The biggest change was moving the locking lugs from the rear of the bolt sleeve to the front of the bolt sleeve.

Schmidt–Rubin

This allowed the receiver to be shortened by a small amount. In addition the change allowed the bolt and receiver to handle more pressure. Colonel Schmidt was asked to do this for the model but refused claiming it was not possible. Colonel Vogelsgang and his assistant Rebholz worked out the details which were not complex but did require time to retool.

Gun Review: Swiss Schmidt-Rubin Model 1896/11 rifle in 7.5x55mm

The rifle system was adopted in When the cartridge was modified in to increase the velocity of the bullet the bolt system was used. Only a few remain in the original configuration and almost all of those are private series rifles that were never military issue. The Schmidt-Rubin Model cadet rifle was intended as a replacement for the earlier Vetterli rifles. It was to use a reduced power 7. The rifles sights were graduated both for the light and the standard loads.

There were approximately of the cadet rifles made. Design began February 27and production began in and lasted for 10 years 18, were made. This short rifle was spread to: fortress troops, artillery men, bicycle troops, and balloon companies. Very few unconverted rifles exist today. The changes streamlined the appearance of the rifles.

Because more rifles were needed than were available, the model rifle was put into production with slight changes. An improvement over the original,version of the Schmidt—Rubin rifle, the Swiss M placed the locking lugs in the middle of the bolt, rather than at the rear, strengthening the action and allowing a more powerful cartridge, the Gewehrpatrone 11 or GP 11 to be used.

It uses a graduated tangent sight which begins at meters. The fact that Switzerland remained neutral through both world wars ensured that they are in far better condition, on average, than the rifles of other European nations from that vintage.Original Item: Only One Available.

This means that all model Schmidt Rubin rifles are pre, and considered antique under Federal Law. As this is rifle serial numberwe estimate this rifle was produced in Serial number is present on all components of the rifle, with shortened number even being stamped on all parts of the rear sight. The rifle cycles securely, with a very satisfying "clunk-click".

The magazine cutoff lever works correctly as well. There are multiple Swiss Cross proof marks on the metal components of a gun, which are in very good condition, with most of the original finish present. The bolt is still bright steel, and the barrel is in excellent condition, with a bright finish and crisp lands and grooves. The stock does have some small dents, chips, and other wear from over a century of age and storage, but it is still quite attractive and a lovely color.

There is even a good amount of flame figure in the butt stock area on both sides. Overall this is a very attractive rifle, which will look great in any collection.

Ready to display! The Model was the first in the series of Schmidt—Rubin rifles, which served Switzerland from to The rifle takes its name from the designer of its action, Colonel Rudolf Schmidt, and the designer of its ammunition, Colonel Eduard Rubin. The straight-pull bolt action allows the user to pull the bolt straight back to unlock the action and eject the spent cartridge in one motion, and push the bolt forward to chamber a round, cock the striker, and lock the action.

This is as opposed to a traditional bolt action, wherein the user must lift the bolt handle to unlock the action before pulling the bolt back. The rifle is roughly musket length, with a free-floating barrel, round magazine and wood stock that extends almost to the tip of the barrel. The Schmidt—Rubin was an advanced weapon for its time, and was one of the first rifles to use copper-jacketed ammunition as its standard ammunition. The GP90 7.

Rubin in was revolutionary in that most of the bullets used in Europe at the time, except for the Mle Lebel rifle metal-jacketed 8mm bullet, were around. Strangely enough, the round was "paper patched" meaning that the bullet was surrounded by a piece of paper, much like the cotton patches placed around a musket ball.

Paper patching the round was supposed to aid in the lubrication of the bullet. Title 18, U. Code, Section a 16 defines antique firearms as all guns made prior to This law exempts antique firearms from any form of gun control or special engineering because they are not legally considered firearms. These antique guns are not sold in "live" condition.

They are sold as collector's items or as "wall hangers".

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Any attempt at restoring an antique gun to be operational is strongly discouraged and is done so at the risk of the customer. By purchasing an antique gun from IMA you thereby release IMA, its employees and corporate officers from any and all liability associated with use of our Antique guns. Pre Manufacture, no licenses required, allowed to ship to almost any deliverable address across the globe.

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swiss 1889 magazine

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